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Up Close & Personal: Cormac

Welcome to a new feature of NationStates Today, which I hope will feature in many an issue to come. In “Up Close and Personal”, I will talk to the most influential players in NationStates Gameplay about the issues that matter to them. Without further ado, here is the first individual who I have gone Up Close and Personal with, and who better to start with than the award-winning Most Influential Player in NationStates Gameplay, Cormac.


With the recent coming to prominence of the user-created-region  (UCR) Pacifica and the ongoing conflict between the Anti-Pacific Coalition (APC) and the New Pacific Order (NPO), NS Today journalist Wymondham spoke to WA delegate and winner of the NS Gameplay Awards Most Influential Gameplayer award Cormac about both topics.

Cormac has been in Nationstates since February of 2012 and since then he has been Pharaoh of Osiris (one of the three Game Created Sinker Regions) thrice. Cormac is renowned throughout NationStates for his wide-ranging network of sources and contacts. He is often the first to find out about information from secret Discord servers, coup plots and other pieces of intrigue. Cormac was the first person to post the leaks via his news organization The Miniluv Messenger which lead to the ongoing conflict that involves the APC fighting against the NPO. With this in mind, I recently sat down with Cormac to talk about a range of issues involving the APC vs NPO war and his new job as WA delegate of the up and coming region Pacifica.

Cormac is a very strong believer in the principles Pacifica was founded on, which, when combined with his personal belief in the war against the New Pacific Order, creates a rather formidable foundation on which Pacifica can be built. When asked what he saw in Pacifica, he had this to say:

Well, on a personal note I’ve been friends with Topid for years now, and after his predicament of being exiled from his home region of St Abbaddon, I wanted to help him build up Pacifica. Aside from that, I see an opportunity for a UCR to grow according to democratic principles, which I think is something the game needs right now, and of course, Pacifica is at war with the NPO so given my own strongly anti-NPO views it seemed like a natural fit.

Cormac has a vital grasp of the fundamental systems of government in NationStates and this is coupled with an almost encyclopedic knowledge on the various ideologies in the game. Cormac has rallied against “Francoism” for many years and as such, it’s not surprising that Pacifica will exhibit a fundamental rejection of that ideology;

Liberty. Democracy is important to us as a region, but we don’t seek to impose it on others who have alternative systems that work well for them. We do believe others should enjoy liberty as a universal principle though, which is why we oppose the NPO’s chokehold on St Abbaddon through their puppet-king Kitsco, why we stand against the tyranny the NPO imposes upon the Pacific, and ultimately why we are so emphatically anti-fascist. Everyone should be relatively free to enjoy NationStates in the way of their choosing. No one should be oppressed, especially not based on arbitrary concepts like “Feederite” and “Userite,” the dichotomy the NPO has used to demonize its external critics and to silence internal dissent. Pacifica stands for liberty, in stark contrast to our enemies, who stand for mass oppression to keep themselves in power.

When asked about whether he feels GCRs or UCRs are best suited to democracy, Cormac wishes to keep an open mind with regards to the many available systems of government.

I don’t think one system is best for all regions, be they UCR or GCR. I’ve seen democracy work well in TNP, not so well in Osiris. I’ve seen stratocracy work well in The Black Hawks, but republicanism works well in Europeia. So when I say the game needs more UCRs grown according to democratic principles, it’s not necessarily because the game needs more democracy, but because it needs more diversity. We’ve started to tilt too much toward centralized government and we need to make sure there’s a diverse balance. But I wouldn’t say democracy is the best thing for every region. Each region has a right to self-determination in its form of government.

The Pacifican constitution is somewhat different to others in that it splits the executive between a Prime Minister who focuses on internal affairs and a President that focuses on external affairs, but Cormac thinks that this system may be coming into vogue:

Well, it’s an idea that I’ve heard has been proposed in Europeia’s reform discussions, and The New Inquisition used to have a similar divided executive system and it worked well there. I think it’s a good way to let people with different talents campaign for the office that suits their talents. Sometimes you have someone who is good with foreign affairs, military affairs, etc., but not very good with integration, culture, media, etc. Or you have someone who’s great at the latter but doesn’t know anything about or isn’t at all interested in the former. I don’t think it makes sense to ask someone who’s good at one set of gameplay activities to be forced to oversee the other set, whether they’re interested in it or good at it or not. We should let people do what they’re good at and interested in doing.

Cormac has been a major player in the ongoing war between the Anti Pacific Coalition and the New Pacific Order, however, Cormac is no stranger to inter-regional warfare; he was Pharaoh of Osiris during their war with Lazarus from the 28th of August 2014 until 12th October 2018. He had this to say regarding the most effective tactic utilised by either side during this conflict

GCR warfare is all about information. It’s about getting information to the natives of the Pacific about the long history of tyranny perpetrated by the NPO. Of course, there are other facets to GCR warfare, but if you’re not waging an information campaign you might as well not bother. The information campaign is something the Coalition forces have been doing well. We see the results of it in East Durthang’s inability to build a high enough endorsement count to assume the Delegacy of the Pacific, which is an embarrassment for the NPO and calls into question their supposedly invincible hold over the Pacific. The Coalition should continue to hammer away at the NPO by reaching out directly to the Pacific’s natives, as they’ve already been doing with a lot of success. It’s a long process but ultimately it’s what needs to happen. I’m glad they’ve stayed focused on that.

Cormac has seen many a war, having joined NS in February 2012, and when asked to use his experience to predict how the next few months will pan out for both sides, he stated

The momentum is with the APC. Over the past several years, the NPO has had a talent deficit and that deficit has now reached rock bottom. They’re simply running on fumes, and it’s showing in the inability of their chosen Delegate to actually govern the Pacific according to game mechanics, their primary litmus test for GCR governance. What’s more, they’re still wasting their already limited resources on the tyrannical “protectorate” status of St Abbaddon, which is diverting attention away from the NPO where it’s badly needed. There’s no indication any of that is going to stop, or that they’re learning anything from their mistakes. The APC is steadily chipping away at the NPO and its hold on the Pacific, and the NPO is really doing nothing to counter it.

The most that has happened in the NPO recently is the NS, CN, and PNW NPO forums have been merged and now, on the NPO forum, there isn’t even an application process for the NS NPO yet. That speaks volumes. It’s all   Darkesia said is happening — an invasion of our game by players of other games. It’s an occupation of the Pacific by CN and PNW players. And it couldn’t be more clear. They can’t hold onto the Pacific that way forever.

I’d like to add my thanks with regard to the courteous way in which this request for an interview and the interview itself was received by Cormac, it was also good to see that Cormac felt he was given the space to air his views

Thank you! It was nice to be able to talk candidly about these issues.

Pacifica is poised to become one of the up and coming regions in the game this year, with elections coming around the corner that will be covered by the Politics team at NationStates Today.


Wymondham: Hi Cormac, Wymondham here from NationStates Today. You have been the delegate of Pacifica for nearly a month now, what did you see in Pacifica that attracted you to Pacifica?

Cormac: Well, on a personal note I’ve been friends with Topid for years now, and after his predicament of being exiled from his home region of St Abbaddon, I wanted to help him build up Pacifica. Aside from that, I see an opportunity for a UCR to grow according to democratic principles, which I think is something the game needs right now, and of course, Pacifica is at war with the NPO so given my own strongly anti-NPO views it seemed like a natural fit.

Wymondham: Do you feel that democracy is best in UCRs or GCRs and why?

Cormac: I don’t think one system is best for all regions, be they UCR or GCR. I’ve seen democracy work well in TNP, not so well in Osiris. I’ve seen stratocracy work well in The Black Hawks, but republicanism works well in Europeia. So when I say the game needs more UCRs grown according to democratic principles, it’s not necessarily because the game needs more democracy, but because it needs more diversity. We’ve started to tilt too much toward centralized government and we need to make sure there’s a diverse balance. But I wouldn’t say democracy is the best thing for every region. Each region has a right to self-determination in its form of government.

Wymondham: With regards to the Pacifica constitution you chose to split the Premiership between an outward facing President and an inwardly focused Prime minister. What gave you this idea, and why did you choose it?

Cormac: Well, it’s an idea that I’ve heard has been proposed in Europeia’s reform discussions, and The New Inquisition used to have a similar divided executive system and it worked well there. I think it’s a good way to let people with different talents campaign for the office that suits their talents. Sometimes you have someone who is good with foreign affairs, military affairs, etc., but not very good with integration, culture, media, etc. Or you have someone who’s great at the latter but doesn’t know anything about or isn’t at all interested in the former. I don’t think it makes sense to ask someone who’s good at one set of gameplay activities to be forced to oversee the other set, whether they’re interested in it or good at it or not. We should let people do what they’re good at and interested in doing.(edited)

Wymondham: With regards to the ongoing war with the New Pacific Order(NPO) what do you feel the most successful tactic that could be or is being utilised against the NPO is?

Cormac: GCR warfare is all about information. It’s about getting information to the natives of the Pacific about the long history of tyranny perpetrated by the NPO. Of course there are other facets to GCR warfare, but if you’re not waging an information campaign you might as well not bother. The information campaign is something the Coalition forces have been doing well. We see the results of it in East Durthang’s inability to build a high enough endorsement count to assume the Delegacy of the Pacific, which is an embarrassment for the NPO and calls into question their supposedly invincible hold over the Pacific. The Coalition should continue to hammer away at the NPO by reaching out directly to the Pacific’s natives, as they’ve already been doing with a lot of success. It’s a long process but ultimately it’s what needs to happen. I’m glad they’ve stayed focused on that.

Wymondham: How do you see the next few months panning out for those involved in the APC vs NPO war

Cormac: The momentum is with the APC. Over the past several years, the NPO has had a talent deficit and that deficit has now reached rock bottom. They’re simply running on fumes, and it’s showing in the inability of their chosen Delegate to actually govern the Pacific according to game mechanics, their primary litmus test for GCR governance. What’s more, they’re still wasting their already limited resources on the tyrannical “protectorate” status of St Abbaddon, which is diverting attention away from the NPO where it’s badly needed. There’s no indication any of that is going to stop, or that they’re learning anything from their mistakes. The APC is steadily chipping away at the NPO and its hold on the Pacific, and the NPO is really doing nothing to counter it.

The most that has happened in the NPO recently is the NS, CN, and PNW NPO forums have been merged and now, on the NPO forum, there isn’t even an application process for the NS NPO yet. That speaks volumes. It’s all   Darkesia said is happening — an invasion of our game by players of other games. It’s an occupation of the Pacific by CN and PNW players. And it couldn’t be more clear. They can’t hold onto the Pacific that way forever.

Wymondham: What do you feel is the fundamental ideal of Pacifica?

Cormac: Liberty. Democracy is important to us as a region, but we don’t seek to impose it on others who have alternative systems that work well for them. We do believe others should enjoy liberty as a universal principle though, which is why we oppose the NPO’s chokehold on St Abbaddon through their puppet-king Kitsco, why we stand against the tyranny the NPO imposes upon the Pacific, and ultimately why we are so emphatically anti-fascist. Everyone should be relatively free to enjoy NationStates in the way of their choosing. No one should be oppressed, especially not based on arbitrary concepts like “Feederite” and “Userite,” the dichotomy the NPO has used to demonize its external critics and to silence internal dissent. Pacifica stands for liberty, in stark contrast to our enemies, who stand for mass oppression to keep themselves in power.

Wymondham: Thank you very much Cormac, I hope the rest of NS will enjoy this interview as much as I have


Cormac: Thank you! It was nice to be able to talk candidly about these issues.